Posted 8 months ago

I hate being reminded every day how alone I am. Now I find out the person I’m going to the City and Colour concert has a date. I hate everything right now, especially my tears.

Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago

I text back embarrassingly fast

or three hours later

there is no in between

(Source: shekillswithkissesxo)

Posted 1 year ago
Would love to visit Tibet.

Would love to visit Tibet.

Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago

rhamphotheca:


Walking With Sea Cows, Closing the Gap

by Brian Switek

Sea cows once walked on land. Pezosiren leaves no doubt of that.

This roughly 48 million year old mammal once trod over prehistoric Jamaica, and looked akin to a hippo with the skull of a manatee. Much like Pakicetus in the history of early whales, Pezosiren embodies a critical transitional period in the evolution of manatees and dugongs, yet the place where this amphibious sea cow was found did not match what paleontologists expected.

In the big picture of mammalian evolution, sea cows are paenungulates – members of a group that also encompasses hyraxes, elephants, and extinct branches such as the double-horned Arsinoitherium and the aquatic desmostylians.

The earliest members of these lineages first appear in Africa shortly after the end-Cretaceous extinction of 66 million years ago, with the perplexing exception of the sea cows. The earliest, most archaic progenitors of today’s manatees and dugongs, such as Pezosiren, have been found in Jamaica. Anatomical and genetic evidence is clear that sea cows must have shared an African origin with the other paenungulates, but, until now, no one has picked up the fossil trail of the earliest sirenians.

Today, in PLoS One, paleontologist Julien Benoit and colleagues describe a bone from the Eocene of Tunisia that closes the geographical gap in the sea cow backstory…

(read more: National Geo)

(images: T -uncredited; BL -by TheSuperMat | Wikipedia ; BR - Benoit et al., PLoS ONE)

Posted 1 year ago
Me on a daily basis….

Me on a daily basis….

(Source: )

Posted 1 year ago
Posted 1 year ago

rhamphotheca:

Rare White Whale Off The Coast Of Spitsbergen, Norway, Nov. 2012

Willow the white humpback whale caused quite a splash - after being spotted swimming in a pod of whales. Dan Fisher, 32, was on a boat trip to Svalbard in Norway when he noticed a giant white hump rise from the water. Rushing up a mast to get a better look, he quickly realised he was witnessing one of natures rarest sights - a white whale. Its colour is caused by a condition called Leucism, caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment.

(via: Barcroft Media)

Posted 1 year ago
I said never apologize for how you feel. No one can control how they feel. The sun doesn’t apologize for being the sun. The rain doesn’t say sorry for falling. Feelings just are.
Iain S. Thomas, Intentional Dissonance  (via weaverofstars)

(Source: thenineteenthsecond)